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PointedThree :  Sedan Forums : W126 S,SE,SEC,SEL,SD,SDL Class : DIY Thread

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StickyDIY Thread
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Posted 4/28/2006 11:08 PM
jdc1244

Date registered: Dec 1899
Location:
Vehicle(s):
DIY Thread

Post any 126 DIY job here. You may post a link to a resource or do your own write up.

Changing the ATF and Filter

Tools and Supplies:
8 quarts of Dexron III ATF
AT filter
Pan gasket
Ramps
Torque wrench
Funnel that fits the dipstick tube
27mm socket/wrench with extension
5mm Allen key
Phillips screw driver
8 quart (minimum) drain pan
Lots and lots of rags

Ramps are the safest way to work under the car if you don’t have a lift, imo. First, remove the axle cross member (6 16mm bolts) to access the torque converter drain plug vent. Attach the 27mm socket to the crankshaft bolt and turn the engine clockwise until the converter drain plug can be seen through the vent. Open the plug with the Allen key and let it drain.

Using the Allen key remove the drain plug on the AT pan and let the fluid drain. One option is to let it drain overnight. The lower part of the AT and filter are submerged in ATF in the pan sump and will drip forever when you drop the pan and the filter. Letting it drip will avoid much of the mess. If you elect to drop the pan and replace the filter the right away make sure you’ve got lots of rags around. DO NOT WIPE ANY PART OF THE AT WITH RAGS. Even the smallest fiber can damage the system. There are three Phillips screws holding the filter to the bottom of the AT. Remove the old filter and replace with the new one. Clean the AT pan.

Remove the old pan gasket and replace with the new one, reattach the pan to the bottom of the AT. See the attachment below for torque values and specific instructions as to your transmission such as drain location and amount of ATF needed.

Add four quarts of ATF to the transmission through the dipstick tube using a funnel. Start the car and run the gear selector through all gears. Add more ATF up to less then one quart of ATF to avoid overfilling. For example, if your AT takes 7.9 quarts of fluid add seven quarts. Drive the car and get the ATF hot. On level ground run the gear selector through all the gears again and check the ATF level. Add more fluid if needed.


#5148
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Posted 4/29/2006 2:20 PM
jdc1244

Date registered: Dec 1899
Location:
Vehicle(s):
RE: DIY Thread

There is a size restriction on the attachments, which is fine. I’ll be happy to email the attachment to anyone in need.
#5530 - in reply to #5148
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Posted 5/7/2006 7:14 PM
jdc1244

Date registered: Dec 1899
Location:
Vehicle(s):
Brake Pad Replacement

It’s best to put the front of the car on jack stands and remove both tires at once. That way you can turn the steering wheel and the calipers out for easier access. The procedure is the same for the rear brakes, simply delete the wear sensors.

Tools/supplies:

Textar pads
Bottle of DOT 3 brake fluid, do not open as it may not be needed.
MB anti-rattle paste
Anti-rattle spring a.k.a. cross spring
Four pad wear sensors
Channel lock pliers
Brake fluid bleed screw hose and fluid container
(a Mity-Vac is best)
3/8 in bleed screw wrench
Hammer and punch
Assortment of rags and large and small standard screw drivers

Using the hammer and punch remove the retaining pins. A small screwdriver will work as well. The pins are held fast by the cross spring. When enough of the pinhead on the inside of the caliper is exposed remove the pin with pliers.

The cross spring can be removed when the pins are out. Note that the pins pass through the corresponding loops on the top of the pad. Remove the bleed screw nipple cover and place the bleed screw wrench on the bleed screw and attach the hose over the bleed screw nipple. The connection needs to be air tight as to not get air in the system. The small container at the end on the hose will collect the excess brake fluid when the caliper pistons are retracted. Open the bleed screw. Remember you’re working backwards – as you’re facing the caliper you’ll turn clockwise to loosen, the screw opens with very little effort.

Resist the temptation to pull both pads at once! Do one pad at a time, do not have the caliper ‘padless.’

Using the channel lock pull the pad away from the rotor and against the caliper and piston. This should free the pad enough to remove. It is common for the pad to be hard to remove; being very gentle and careful use the large standard screwdriver to coax the pad out, gently moving it back and forth until it’s free. Pull it out with the pliers when you can.

Open the channel lock all the way, place one jaw on the outside of the caliper and the other on the solid metal part of the piston. Note the dust shield on the outside of the piston, make sure the plier’s jaw is clear of the dust shield and very gently push the piston back into the caliper – DO NOT PUSH TOO FAR or you’ll damage the caliper. As you retract the piston you see a small amount of brake fluid drain into the hose and container.
Spread a thin amount of anti-rattle paste on the back of the pad where indicated in the image below. One packet can do an axle. Insert the wear sensor and install the pad.
Repeat the process for the other pad and again the other caliper.

Close the bleed screw and remove the hose, replace the cover over the bleed screw nipple. Place the cross spring in the caliper and insert the retaining pin through the brake pad loops. Using the punch drive the pin into the caliper so the pin is secure, you should see the point of the pin sticking out of the caliper pinhole just as it was before the job.

The brakes may feel a little light when you first step on them but they’ll firm back to normal on the second or third application. With new pads the pistons do not need to extend as far for the pads to contact the rotor, thus less fluid is needed. The amount of fluid bled will be equal to the greater thickness of the pads. If the low brake fluid light come on add some fluid to the reservoir

I recommend checking the pads once a year and replacing them when half worn, to wear to the brake pad sensor is too low in my opinion and forces the pistons to ‘hyper-extend’ to compensate. I believe this adds stress to the caliper and may cause leaking and a premature rebuild or replacement of the caliper.











(ATE Teves caliper lable.JPG)



(Textar pads apply.JPG)



Attachments
----------------
Attachments ATE Teves caliper lable.JPG (41KB - 0 downloads)
Attachments Textar pads apply.JPG (52KB - 0 downloads)
#10440 - in reply to #5148
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Posted 5/10/2006 8:07 PM
jdc1244

Date registered: Dec 1899
Location:
Vehicle(s):
ATF and Filter Change Specifications Attachment

Please see the attachment for capacities and torque values.



Attachments
----------------
Attachments 2702 atf change.pdf (182KB - 40 downloads)
#9657 - in reply to #5148
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Posted 8/17/2006 12:33 AM
BNZ

Date registered: Dec 1899
Location:
Vehicle(s):
RE: DIY Thread

Here's two links that cover a lot of general problems.

http://diymbrepair.com/

http://www.mercedesshop.com/Wikka/DoItYourSelf
#38736 - in reply to #5148
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Posted 9/3/2006 2:46 AM
shrimpton

Date registered: Dec 1899
Location:
Vehicle(s):
RE: DIY Thread

I've found this link really helpful:
http://mb.braingears.com/126_DISC2/program/matrix.htm
#42776 - in reply to #38736
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